Marian Mahler. Images courtesy of Jill A. Wiltse, Class of 1970, and H. Kirk Brown III Collection, Denver, CO.
Designing Women of Postwar Britain: Their Art and the Modern Interior

The art of textile design radically changed after World War II. Three women artists working in England in the 1950s were pivotal in this artistic revolution. The drab days of the War were suddenly washed with the light of the fresh, progressive designs by Lucienne Day, Marian Mahler and Jacqueline Groag. Original artist designs incorporating bold abstract patterns, inspired by Modern artists like Alexander Calder and Joan Miro, and the use of dramatic saturated color marked a striking departure from England's conventional notions of interior fabric design. Designing Women showcases the stunning geometric and abstract designs of the three leaders with furnishing fabrics, hand-towels, and dishware in varied sizes and colors.

Jacqueline Groag. Images courtesy of Jill A. Wiltse, Class of 1970, and H. Kirk Brown III Collection, Denver, CO.

Exhibit curator Shanna Shelby draws from the Denver collection of Jill A. Wiltse and H. Kirk Brown III, whose passion for this unique area of design showcases rare and hard-to-find patterns. Collaboration with the Apparel and Textile Design Program, Department of Art & Art History and sponsored by the MSU Federal Credit Union.

A 78-page full-color illustrated catalogue, edited by Shanna Shelby and Angela Brill, accompanies the exhibition.

Image credits top to bottom: Marian Mahler, Jacqueline Groag, Lucienne Day. Images courtesy of Jill A. Wiltse, Class of 1970, and H. Kirk Brown III Collection, Denver, CO.

Kresge Art Museum

FILM

Contemporary Days: The Designs of Lucienne and Robin Day
(2010, 75 min., directed by Murray Grigor)
Thursday, October 21, 7-9 pm
Room W449, MSU Main Library
Presenter: April Allen, assistant professor, Interior Design

A new documentary film presented by Design Onscreen – The Initiative for Architecture and Design on Film

Robin and Lucienne Day transformed 20th century design with striking furniture and textiles, and helped fuel the artistic and commercial awakening that led Britain out of the devastation of World War II. Robin's revolutionary furniture designs introduced materials such as plastic, steel and plywood to homes, offices and schools, and Lucienne's abstract textile designs brought accessible elegance into the homes of postwar British consumers. Co-sponsor: MSU Library Film Series.

Lucienne Day. Images courtesy of Jill A. Wiltse, Class of 1970, and H. Kirk Brown III Collection, Denver, CO.